Dhaka to Dakar: Book Three – Across Africa

Book Three: Across Africa (Amazon US link)

Book Three: Across Africa (Amazon UK Link)

The third and final book takes me through seven countries in West Africa, and the most challenging and confronting part of the journey by far. Am I up for the challenges of Ghana and Burkina Faso? How will I deal with the poverty and sense of hopelessness of Niger? Will I get done by Voodoo in Benin or Togo? What will I make of the wonders of Mali? And when my journey ends in Senegal, how will I react?

Africa presents new challenges and confronted me regularly in ways I hadn’t been confronted in the whole journey. A very different part of the world, I had already been to Europe and Asia before, including the sub-continent, but I had never been to sub-Saharan Africa before. West Africa has its attractions – especially Mali with the Dogon Escarpment and the amazing Mosque at Djenne. But I also visited countries like Niger and Burkina Faso, with less to see but just as much to experience. To reach Agadez in Niger was special – I felt I was as far away from the world I knew than I had ever been. This book is full of adventure, challenges and everything else that makes backpacking worthwhile.

The most engrossing of all three books, this is also available in chapters.

Chapter 15: Ghana

15 Ghana cover

Chapter 16: Togo and Benin

togo and benin cover

Chapter 17: Niger

cover niger copy

Chapter 18: Burkina Faso

burkina cover

Chapter 19: Mali

mali cover

Chapter 20: Senegal

cover senegal

 

Here is a review from a customer on Amazon. A VERY kind one.

 

 
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent travel journal account of Burkina Faso September 1, 2013
Format:Kindle Edition|Amazon Verified Purchase
I really enjoyed this book, especially given its modest cost and production efforts. The photos are great and were easy to view in my Kindle Paperwhite. The author has an engaging writing style. I was trying to do some research on Burkina Faso as a country for human rights reporting purposes. This book gave me a very good anecdotal coverage of the people and countryside. I was especially intrigued to hear of the author’s ability to use Internet cafes everywhere he went, which helped me establish in my human rights reporting that Internet access is possible in the country, even if it is one of the poorest and most technology-challenged countries in the world.

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