Short Journeys: Kazakhstan

cover kazakhstan copy

US Store – Short Journeys Kazakhstan ($1.39)

UK Store – Short Journeys Kazakhstan (£0.89)

Now available on Payhip:

Short Journeys: Kazakhstan [2nd Edition, Payhip link, JUST $0.85!]

And Lulu:

Short Journeys: Kazakhstan [2nd Edition, Lulu link, $1.59]

Kazakhstan is the world’s ninth-biggest country, perched in Central Asia bordering China, Russia and other central Asian states such as Kyrgyzstan. Today it is a country emerging into the world with a vibrant economy, wonderful culture and tradition, and stunning landscapes from the flat steppe to beautiful mountains.

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I thoroughly enjoyed my time in this amazing country. Astana stands somewhere near the middle with its Norman Foster architecture, a Dubai in the middle of nowhere. The future of this exciting country is being created here with some of the most amazing futuristic buildings in the entire world.

Cathedral in Panfilov Park, Almaty

Cathedral in Panfilov Park, Almaty

In the south is the biggest city in Kazakhstan – Almaty. Full of culture and style, beautifully situated surrounded by mountains, this is the ‘soul’ of Kazakhstan. To the north-west is Semey, an interesting city where you can visited the museum to Abay, Kazakhstan’s most revered poet. If that doesn’t fulfil you desire to explore the literary history of the region, there is also a small museum to Dostoyevsky, in the house where he once lived.

Astana Train Station

Astana Train Station

Palace of Peace and Accord, Astana

Palace of Peace and Accord, Astana

Reviews on Amazon:

4.0 out of 5 stars A must read before travelling to Kazakhstan January 6, 2014

By Fred

Amazon Verified Purchase

Great narrative, well written giving an insight into everyday life. Written by someone who has obviously embraced the feelings of the people.

4.0 out of 5 stars An overview from a friendly and enthusiastic guide January 4, 2014

By A. Feeney

Amazon Verified Purchase

This brief book falls somewhere between a miniature guidebook and a miniature travel memoir, resulting in the equivalent of an informative friend telling you about his trip. The book brims with enthusiasm about everything there is to experience, from the ambitious new architecture of Astana to the older parks and monuments. It’s honest about some of the drawbacks, particularly the bad roads in some parts of the country, but doesn’t dwell on these

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